Page 17

University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law - Summer/Fall 2016

During high school in Petaluma, her United Anglers club built a fish hatchery on campus, where they raised steelhead to repopulate the local creek. Harder was tasked with writing the city council about the need to support the creek’s health. “That’s when I realized I enjoyed the intersection of natural resources and politics,” she says. Today, Harder’s area of Assistant Professor Jennifer Harder expertise is water allocation, which, among other issues, concerns environmental compliance, water-use efficiency, and water- and land-use conflicts. Harder says her decade of experience in the field “lends itself to the kind of education students here are longing for: a practical, interdisciplinary education.” McGeorge’s proximity to the capital and strong connection with public officials also make it ideal for meaningful interaction between the campus and the community. In 2014, Harder coauthored an update of Cases and Materials on Water Law, one of the best-known water law casebooks, originally authored by former McGeorge law professor Frank Trelease. She is now working on a wholesale revision, which will add new topics, as well as contain resources and online links to make the material more interdisciplinary and practical to apply. Harder has also developed online courses on water law for the university. “What an exciting time this is for McGeorge and its Water Law program,” Harder says. “The very rich resources we have, given our connection to the University of the Pacific campus and its economists, scientists and engineers, together with the new public policy program, make this an exciting opportunity to bring an interdisciplinary approach to education and really make our program special.” Karrigan Börk Putting Science Into Action When asked to explain how he could write more than 100 pages on the tiny Section 5937 of the Fish and Game Code—a section that’s only 130 words longs— Karrigan Börk, a visiting assistant law professor at McGeorge, answers with a laugh. “Yes, 5937 is pretty short, but so is the First Amendment,” he says. Börk’s passion for environmental law is evident in his approach to teaching, both at the law school and at University of the Pacific, where he teaches undergraduate courses in the Earth and Environmental Sciences department. In both cases, he urges students into the field, showing them the effects of legislation like the Clean Water Act and the Endangered Species Act by visiting fish hatcheries and nature habitats. “Being close to the capital and to nature is great for policy-driven students,” he says. “They can see the difference that strong environmental laws make.” Börk’s seminal work on the Fish and Game Code concerns the rights of fish to assemble downstream of dams. The decades-old law hasn’t been applied and enforced properly, which frequently has led to a lack of adequate water flow, devastating fish populations. That’s the crisis his paper attempts to rectify. Earlier in his career, Börk planned on becoming a conservation biologist, but his time working at Trout Unlimited, a fisheries interest group in Washington, D.C., convinced him that conservation required a strong legal framework. Years later, while at the U.S. Department of Transportation as a Truman Fellow, drafting fuel economy guidelines, Börk learned to balance concerns for environmental and human welfare. And a foundation in the law, he notes, is essential for driving change in these areas. As he observes, “Law puts science into action.” “What an exciting time this is for McGeorge and its Water Law program.” —Assistant Professor Jennifer Harder r e at e Y e v e t Visiting Assistant S Professor Karrigan Börk paci f i c l aw 15


University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law - Summer/Fall 2016
To see the actual publication please follow the link above