Page 27

University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law - Summer 2013

LL.M. students can pick from two tracks: the U.S. law track or the international track. For graduates who focus on international issues, Pacific McGeorge also offers a Doctor of Juridical Science (legal education’s counterpart to a Ph.D.) in international water resources law. A multiyear degree, the J.S.D. program was established because McCaffrey received inquiries from practitioners around the globe seeking intensive, advanced training. Graduates of the J.S.D. program have gone on to work on water policy in Alabama, advise the Foreign Ministry and Ministry of Agriculture in Afghanistan, and teach in Brazil. The next phase of the water law program’s development is to establish a distance-learning component with core courses offered online, according to Weber. A pilot class in water use efficiency law was launched last fall and included seven students, including practicing attorneys and nonlawyer professionals. The Student Experience But even for J.D. students interested in water law, Pacific McGeorge offers an unparalleled experience. Tori Sundheim, ’13, decided she wanted to become a water lawyer after earning an undergraduate business degree at Emory University. “I grew up in the Florida Keys consciously aware of the fact that our natural resources are limited,” she says. After researching programs across the country, Sundheim determined that Pacific McGeorge would offer the best experience. That’s proved true. In her first year, Sundheim co-founded the school’s Water Law Society, which has since grown to 40 members and provides speakers, career information, field trips and other professional opportunities for students interested in water law. She also launched the California Water Law Journal, a collaboration between Pacific McGeorge and UC Davis School of Law that serves as a vehicle for students and professionals to engage in high-quality research and academic discourse. Sundheim also led the effort to get Pacific McGeorge included in the California Water Law Symposium, a collaboration among the University of San Francisco School of Law, Golden Gate University School of Law, UC Hastings College of the Law, UC Berkeley School of Law and UC Davis School of Law, and the 2010 recipient of the ABA’s Section of Environment, Energy, and Resources Law Student Program of the Year Award. Along with faculty adviser Weber, Sundheim helped coordinate Pacific McGeorge’s first panel for the symposium: “What’s Really Killing The Salmon: What is the Role of the Law When Faced With Scientific Uncertainty and a Fractured Governmental System?” Panelists included professors, private attorneys and lawyers with California’s State Water Resources Control Board and the National Resources Defense Council. After graduation, Sundheim plans to practice water law, “whether that be in areas of water quality, water rights, tribal water law or even working on public policy issues,” she says. “Regardless of where I end up in the long run, these experiences have provided a solid foundation and knowledge base that I am confident will contribute to a successful career.” ◆ “Regardless of where I end up in the long run—whether that be in areas of water quality, water rights, tribal water law or even working on public policy issues— these experiences have provided a solid foundation and knowledge base that I am confident will contribute to a successful career.” —Tori Sundheim, ’13 Tori Sundheim, ’13, co-founder of Pacific McGeorge’s Water Law Society paci f ic l aw 25 e d a s m u s


University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law - Summer 2013
To see the actual publication please follow the link above