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University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law - Summer 2014

at the epicenter of important policymaking, with four large health care systems—Kaiser, Sutter, UC Davis and Dignity Health—in their backyard. The Pacific 2020 strategic plan cites specific objectives to introduce “multidisciplinary programs in health care, business, law, engineering and other fields,” as well as “pre-professional and professional programs in new, highdemand health-related fields and healthcare professions.” Toward that end, “we have been tasked to develop interdisciplinary training with the dental school and the pharmacy school at the university,” Brown says. “We have had discussions with major health care providers, for example, about ways to reduce medical malpractice claims by training lawyers and others in effective mediation strategies and conflict resolution.” Landsberg envisions adding new courses to the law school’s current offerings in health law and policy, bioethics, and elder and health law. Debuting this spring is an innovative course in executive training, called Compliance in the Health Care Industry: Real World Application of Law to Business, taught by a compliance expert from Genentech. “We want to reach out to our alumni and health care specialists in the legal and business communities to figure out what sort of additional health care curriculum we should offer,” says Landsberg, “and perhaps also find among their ranks good adjuncts who can help us teach the needed courses.” Looking ahead, Landsberg adds, “McGeorge is positioning itself as the graduate campus for the University of the Pacific. By fall 2015, the university plans to offer an MBA program here. The MBA program already has a health care specialty, and when it is in Sacramento, there will be additional opportunities for lawyers and MBA students to take classes together.” McGeorge is now offering a Master of Science degree in law and is beginning to target health care managers and other professionals who would benefit from its one-year full-time, or two-year part-time, executive training. Taken altogether, the changes underway and those planned “make for an exciting time,” Brown says. “It’s an opportunity to frame the issues and to prepare our students to shape the future. We’re building a robust program that ultimately will be beneficial to the entire community.” + Experiential Focus on Health Law PACIFIC MCGEORGE STUDENTS GAIN WORK EXPERIENCE THROUGH FIELD PLACEMENT PROGRAMS AND LEGAL CLINICS. MANY ESTABLISHED HEALTH LAW PLACEMENTS AND THE ELDER & HEALTH LAW CLINIC PROVIDE ACADEMIC AND SKILL-BUILDING OPPORTUNITIES TO STUDENTS PURSUING CAREERS IN HEALTH LAW. Here’s what students say about the hands-on experience they have gained in the field of health law: “ … this placement led to my next job, which was a paid law clerk position.” — Saveena Takhar, ‘14, Department of Public Health extern student “ My clinic experience provided real-life situations— not the typical classroom environment. I was able to see how legal issues are resolved in the real world. As a result, I am a better prepared attorney.” —Cheryl Robertson ’10, associate attorney, Dummit, Buchholz & Trapp “ “It is fantastic experience in real-world issues. It has made me far more proficient in starting research from nothing and creating a wellrounded analysis of the law.” —Ryan Hawley-Jones, ‘15, extern, Attorney General’s Office of Health, Education and Welfare PACI F I C L AW 29


University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law - Summer 2014
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