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University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law - Summer2015

Alumni News PACI F I C L AW 29 consecutive nomination, and he was selected as a Top Attorney in Pasadena magazine for business litigation. | Rochelle Swanson was selected for the 2014 Sacramento Business Journal’s Women Who Mean Business program. Swanson is a regional account manager at CTI Towers, Inc. and a City of Davis council member. 2004 Rebecca Dietzen is the 2015 president of Women Lawyers of Sacramento. She is an attorney III at the California Department of Health Care Services. | Neil Forester has co-founded a new firm, Forester and Purcell Inc., in Folsom. | Aaron Ralph joined the Washington, D.C. office of Greenberg Traurig as an associate in its government contracts and projects practice group. Prior to joining the firm, he served as an attorney with the Air Force’s Acquisition Law and Litigation Directorate. 2005 Annie Amaral has been named partner in the Sacramento firm Most of our time in law school is spent reading judicial decisions as law schools traditionally focus on the development of common law. Because our legal training is based largely on case law interpretation, law students spend little time on statutory development and construction. Moreover, law schools rarely teach aspiring lawyers about how laws and regulations are made, or how to change laws or regulations to benefit their clients. In most instances, when you are practicing law, you interpret the law as written based upon application of cases and statutes to the specific facts of your client’s case. While any lawyers will apply the facts of their case to the law as it exists, a really good lawyer should also look closely at changing the law to benefit his or her client’s position. Lawyers today will be better able to think about changing the law (statutes or regulations) by understanding the lawmaking and rulemaking processes, as well as the role of lobbyists in these processes at the state level. There are considerable benefits for a lawyer to understand the lawmaking and rulemaking processes. When appropriate, changing the law should be an option that is provided to your client. Chris Micheli, ’92, is an attorney and registered lobbyist with the Sacramento government relations firm of Aprea & Micheli, Inc. who writes frequently for Capitol Weekly. Jennifer Barrera is an attorney and policy advocate with the California Chamber of Commerce. Read this entire article at McGeorge.edu/news/ChangeTheLaw.htm. HELPING YOUR CLIENT’S LEGAL PROBLEM BY CHANGING THE LAW By Chris Micheli, ’92, and Jennifer Barrera


University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law - Summer2015
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